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Arctic Front Deluxe #4 - Gathering Darkness Little Saturn #5 - Back to the Don
Heroes of the Soviet Union #3 - The Bloodiest Fight Red Warriors #20 - The Bloodiest Fight
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East of Taegu
Counter Attack #29
(Attacker) North Korea vs South Korea (Defender)
Formations Involved
Display
Balance:



Overall balance chart for KWCA029
Total
Side 1 1
Draw 0
Side 2 1
Overall Rating, 2 votes
5
4
3
2
1
4
Scenario Rank: --- of 588
Parent Game Counter Attack
Historicity Historical
Date 1950-09-02
Start Time 13:00
Turn Count 14
Visibility Day
Counters 51
Net Morale 1
Net Initiative 2
Maps 1: 115
Layout Dimensions 43 x 28 cm
17 x 11 in
Play Bounty 155
AAR Bounty 156
Total Plays 2
Total AARs 2
Battle Types
Delaying Action
Enter & Exit
Conditions
Scenario Requirements & Playability
Counter Attack maps + counters
Introduction

The hapless North Korean 8th Division had been nearly annihilated during its first battles in August 1950. Withdrawn from the front and replenished with a large number of raw replacements, it was ordered back on the attack despite its manifest inability to conduct road marches, much less an offensive. It went forward even so, accompanied by a newly-formed tank brigade.

Conclusion

Somehow the 8th Division’s political cadre convinced the raw recruits to storm the ROK positions along the road leading south to Hwajong-dong. The NKPA division took heavy losses but managed to force its way southward, helped by the brand-new tanks of the brand-new 17th Armored Brigade. They would eventually take Hwajong-dong but could advance no further before the ROK counter-offensive began.


Display Relevant AFV Rules

AFV Rules Pertaining to this Scenario's Order of Battle
  • Vulnerable to results on the Assault Combat Chart (7.25, 7.63, ACC), and may be attacked by Anti-Tank fire (11.2, DFT). Anti-Tank fire only affects the individual unit fired upon (7.62, 11.0).
  • AFV's are activated by tank leaders (3.2, 3.3, 5.42, 6.8). They may also be activated as part of an initial activating stack, but if activated in this way would need a tank leader in order to carry out combat movement.
  • AFV's do not block Direct Fire (10.1).
  • Full-strength AFV's with "armor efficiency" may make two anti-tank (AT) fire attacks per turn (either in their action segment or during opportunity fire) if they have AT fire values of 0 or more (11.2).
  • Each unit with an AT fire value of 2 or more may fire at targets at a distance of between 100% and 150% of its printed AT range. It does so at half its AT fire value. (11.3)
  • Efficient and non-efficient AFV's may conduct two opportunity fires per turn if using direct fire (7.44, 7.64). Units with both Direct and AT Fire values may use either type of fire in the same turn as their opportunity fire, but not both (7.22, 13.0). Units which can take opportunity fire twice per turn do not have to target the same unit both times (13.0).
  • Demoralized AFV's are not required to flee from units that do not have AT fire values (14.3).
  • Place a Wreck marker when an AFV is eliminated in a bridge or town hex (16.3).
  • AFV's do not benefit from Entrenchments (16.42).
  • AFV's may Dig In (16.2).
  • Closed-top AFV's: Immune to M, M1 and M2 results on Direct and Bombardment Fire Tables. Do not take step losses from Direct or Bombardment Fire. If X or #X result on Fire Table, make M morale check instead (7.25, 7.41, 7.61, BT, DFT).
  • Closed-top AFV's: Provide the +1 modifier on the Assault Table when combined with infantry. (Modifier only applies to Germans in all scenarios; Soviet Guards in scenarios taking place after 1942; Polish, US and Commonwealth in scenarios taking place after 1943.) (ACC)
  • Tank: all are closed-top and provide the +1 Assault bonus, when applicable
  • Armored Cars: These are Combat Units. They are motorized instead of mechanized. All have their own armored car leaders, who can only activate armored cars (6.85). Do not provide the +1 Assault bonus (ACC).
  • Reconnaissance Vehicle: 8.23 Special Spotting Powers Both foot and vehicle mounted recce units (1.2) possess two special spotting abilities. The first ability is that they can spot enemy in limiting terrain at one hex further than the TEC specifies for other units and leaders. For example, an enemy unit in town can normally be spotted at three hexes or less, but a recce unit can spot them at four hexes.Their second ability is that they can place a Spotted marker on any one enemy unit they can spot per turn, just as if the enemy unit had "blown its cover" by firing. Such Spotted markers are removed as described earlier.

Display Order of Battle

North Korea Order of Battle
Chosŏn'gŭl
  • Mechanized
  • Motorized
South Korea Order of Battle
Daehanminguk Yuk-gun
  • Motorized
  • Towed

Display AARs (2)

Korean War: Counter-Attack, scenario #29: East of Taegu
Author JayTownsend
Method Solo
Victor North Korea
Play Date 2017-05-19
Language English
Scenario KWCA029

Korean War: Counter-Attack, scenario #29: East of Taegu

An interesting scenario where a stronger South Korean Infantry force with a few heavy weapons and Bazooka Teams must stop the North Korean from breaking through their lines. The North Koreans have a weaker Infantry force but are very heavy in armor to off-set this.

The ROK forces setup in kind of a stone wall across the line, covering every hex dug-in, with the Bazooka Teams close to the road and the 75mm Pack Howitzer supporting from a hill top. But the South Koreans also have to cover the whole map, as the NKPA could also come on either or both flanks of the road, which stretches the ROK lines a bit. The North Koreans entered the map on the east side in three locations with the main bunch of armor-infantry mix up the center road and some flanking infantry on both flanks and a BA-64 armored car.

After North Korean hit the South Koreans stone wall, I thought no way was I going to break through but over time holes began to form with stacks of NKPA T34/85 tanks shooting point-blank adjacent to dug-in ROK Infantry. Not being too wise, the Bazooka Teams attack the NKPA armor unsupported and were the first units to die without achieving a result to boot. The North Korean Infantry paid a heavy price on either flank but the Infantry supported in the center by their armor and the cover of heavy woods, by the road had more success. After a very stubborn fight, and a nice hole opened by the road, where two units of T34/85s rolled a two on the dice against dug-in ROK infantry and even with the dug-in modifier they still suffered a 2X or two steps loss of ROK units. Once the hole expanded even larger, the T34/85s rolled through, one even with tank riding Infantry, the NKPA armor car followed as well. I quit after turn 12, after 12 steps of NKPA units had exited the west edge of the map, with another reduced step of armor waiting to exit as well. I think like eight steps of T34/85s, two steps of Infantry and a leader and two steps of Ba-64 exited the map but a ton of NKPA Infantry was left behind in bad shape but still a NKPA victory.

Two things I needed to do or try differently as the ROK player; maybe instead of one long defensive line, a defensive in depth, in layers. Also, I should have risk leaving my dug-in positions and assaulted the NKPA armor. Sure, they would have paid the price but it would have slowed the armor down and maybe winning the game. I could clearly see this scenario being played many ways and won by either side. Fun stuff!

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Not far enough east
Author J6A
Method Solo
Victor South Korea
Play Date 2017-08-21
Language English
Scenario KWCA029

This was a fun scenario, although I have to admit some of the tactics were a bit gamey, IMO. Basically, a T34/85 led force has to break through the South Korean lines and exit 8 steps to win. The tanks have 8/6 morale, all of the infantry is a mere 7/6. And they are facing 8/6 South Koreans. However, the ROK troops have little in the way of AT firepower. A couple of bazookas (1 of each size) and a 75mm Pack Howitzer.

My plan was to send one infantry force down the flank to draw off South Korean troops and to push the tanks through or around the town in the middle. As the South Koreans, I had to spread out my defense not knowing where the North Koreans were going. Of course, as I saw where the thrusts were going, I adjusted things.

The NorKs have a problem here. The tanks are fast and powerful, however there are so many slope hexes that going off road will really slow them down. Heck, staying on road isn't all that quick. However, they did start to make progress against the ROK and were starting to move around the flanks. Unfortunately for them, I poorly positioned the BA-64 and it was assaulted to death with a snake eyes (more on this in a minute). That's 2 steps that probably should have been a "gimme" for North Korea. The North Koreans tried to blast combined tank/infantry forces through the middle, and then I remembered they don't have armor efficiency, so they weren't getting that column shift. Also, the dice loved the ROK in this one. It would be "Okay, North Koreans on the 18 columns, South Koreans on the 13 column. North Korea rolls a 6, South Korea rolls an 11." The assaults which should have been in the North's favor kept stalling.

As for the gamey portion, as North Korean forces infiltrated down the flanks, I kept sending South Koreans to physically stand in a line between them and the edge of the board. Not strong stacks, but stopping for an assault would put the North Koreans off their timetable, and would be in the South Korean favor from a morale standpoint. So the battle took on a chase quality, as the NorKs kept trying to work around the flank. They were hurt by lousy initiative. The North Koreans start with a 5, the South Koreans with a 3, yet the North Koreans won only 1/2 the initiative rolls in the scenario, and only 1 important one.

On turn 12, an assault demoralized the only T34/85s near the edge (2 steps had exited earlier), and the rest of the North Korean force was in shambles. The North Koreans got 4 steps off, and then conceded. One other big factor here was that the North Korean Kommissar was shot early and unable to rally demoralized troops, which meant that guys who became demoralized tended to stay that way.

Overall, a good scenario that would probably play very well opposed. Bad luck really hampered the North in this one, and I can easily see it going their way.

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