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Jeeps
#1
Are Jeeps considered normal transport units? We have a game (An Army at Dawn) where I have 2 Jeeps that I loaded up HMG units to drive them to the front. I think they are actually in the game to tow 2 AT guns that otherwise have no way to move. 

My opponent questioned the ability of Jeeps to move troops as well as trucks. We compromised and let them move HMG's but not full platoons. 
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#2
I don't think I've seen it spelled out. I've just played that the jeep counter represents enough jeeps to move whatever unit is transported. An AT gun outfit would still need more jeeps than they have guns for hauling ammunition and all the personnel of the unit, so I think that a platoon's worth of jeeps would not be too big a problem. This comes up several times in other games in the PG series, as well as Kubelwagons for the Germans.
"Kill them all, let God sort them out."
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#3
Jeeps are a little fuzzy in the game system. They are treated as trucks for combat, but have limits on what they can tow, see rule 5.67. Those restrictions are often modified in special rules to allow towing 50mm/57mm/6-pdr AT guns and/or 75mm howitzers or infantry guns. I would suggest they not be allowed to carry heavy mortars, even though the rule implies that they could.
... actually you Americans are probably the most dangerous people in the world. This is because you treat war as a job, and your culture has an excellent work ethic.
-- paraphrased from John Keegan's Fields of Battle

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#4
(09-26-2017, 12:25 AM)plloyd1010 Wrote: I would suggest they not be allowed to carry heavy mortars, even though the rule implies that they could.

I agree.  I've always considered Heavy mortars as "towed" units, not "foot units."  The German and Romanian heavies have no movement, but the Soviet and North Korean ones have a move of "1" when limbered. 

Does anyone know the reason for the difference? Was the Soviet model able to be broken down into smaller pieces like the US 75mm pack howitzer?
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#5
I suspect a little design license in this case. The Soviet mortar is a modified version of the Brandt 120mm (which the French don't seem to have in their inventory). The German mortar is a copy of the Russian one, as is the Romanian mortar. All weigh about 650 lb. All 3 have tow carriages. All 3 can be broken down into 3 pieces. Of course, we have all seen these sorts of decisions before.
... actually you Americans are probably the most dangerous people in the world. This is because you treat war as a job, and your culture has an excellent work ethic.
-- paraphrased from John Keegan's Fields of Battle

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#6
Maybe the Soviets just have more people to take turns carrying?
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#7
Hearkening back to Panzerblitz, the number of men per tube works out to just under 9 for the Russians and about 12 for the Germans. The German PB piece has 4 tubes and 47 men. The Russian piece is 7 or 8 tubes with 65-70 men.

I still think design to point. Sort of like the 75mm Pak 40 vs the 75mm KwK 40. Primemover rules vs. trucks would be another example.
... actually you Americans are probably the most dangerous people in the world. This is because you treat war as a job, and your culture has an excellent work ethic.
-- paraphrased from John Keegan's Fields of Battle

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